Ubuntu Setup Guide Part V. Installing Software

Posted in Guides, Linux, Lists, Ubuntu by aliencam | 2 Comments »

I install lots of software that I use nearly every day. Here is a list of what I am installing from the start:

(*) gnome-do
(*) crossover office (PAID SOFTWARE) [Microsoft Office 2008, Vector Magic]
(*) crossover games (PAID SOFTWARE)
gcolor2
gscan2pdf
hugin
inkscape
(*) dropbox
ktorrent
nicotine-plus
(*) opera
abiword
bluefish
(*) banshee
dvd::rip
(*) gpodder (needs python-gpod to work with iPods)
pulse audio volume control (pavu-control)
VLC
compiz fusion icon
(*) Mathematica 7
compiz control settings manager (ccsm)
powertop
gparted
ntfsprogs
hfsprogs
kerneloops
gthumb
subversion
bootchart
wacomtools
xflux (see my guide on installing this)
citrix (see my guide on installing this)

Those programs prefixed with (*) should NOT be installed from the Ubuntu repositories. Either they are not in the repos, or I don’t like the version in the repos.

In order to do this, some custom repositories (Launchpad PPAs) must be added. See the following section for how to install software from Launchpad PPAs.

If you want to install most of these at once, you can use the following command:
$ sudo apt-get install gcolor2 gscan2pdf hugin inkscape ktorrent nicotine bluefish dvdrip pavucontrol vlc fusion-icon compizconfig-settings-manager powertop gparted kerneloops gthumb subversion bootchart ntfsprogs hfsprogs wacom-tools xournal cellwriter

Installing Software from a Launchpad PPA.

In order to do this, open System > Administration > Software Sources > Third Party Software and “Add” the following lines:

deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/banshee-team/ppa/ubuntu jaunty main
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/banshee-team/ppa/ubuntu jaunty main

Once you do this, click close, but not refresh (if you do refresh you will get an error, just ignore that until you complete the next step.)

Now for the tricky part of adding custom PPAs — adding the public keys. What you will need to do from the launchpad PPA page is follow these instructions:

On each Launchpad PPA Page will be a line of text similar to the following:
screenshot

“This repository is signed with 1024R/6E80C6B7 OpenPGP key. Follow these instructions for installing packages from this PPA. ”

To install the key, click the link that the numbers are linked, and then again click the “Key ID” link on the next page (another set of numbers). Now you will be at the public key page. From here, copy-paste everything from
“—–BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK—–” to “—–END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK—–”
into a new text document (make it on your desktop, it doesn’t matter where really). Then save this document with any name, close the text editor, then open back up System > Administration > Software Sources, go to the “Authentication” tab, click “import key file” then select the file you created. Once you do this you are okay to delete the file.

Now you are ready to install the program from synaptic, or apt-get.

Ubuntu Setup Guide II. Update and Repository Setup

Posted in Guides, Linux, Lists, Ubuntu by aliencam | No Comments »

Enabling Repositories


Before updating or installing any programs, you should enable more repositories. By default, you will only get security updates, recommended updates, and updates of proprietary drivers / nonfree software in the repositories. With this it is most likely that an update will not break anything new, but you will have older versions of everything.

In order to do this, go to System > Administration > Software Sources, then enter your password and go to the “Updates” tab.

Check both the “Pre-Released Updates” and the “Unsupported Updates” boxes. Pre-released updates means updates that will go into the next 6-month ubuntu release, but did not make the cut for this one, and unsupported updates are updates that are not widely tested for stability yet. Neither are necessary, but I like both of them.

Now, go to the “Third-Party Software” tab and enable both of the repositories there. These “partner repositories” enable the use of non-free software, like flash, mp3 codecs, dvd codecs, and similar. I would say these are necessary unless you want to keep your computer 100% open source (in which case I applaud you for being much more intense than I could stand to be right now).

Then, go to the “statistics” tab, and choose whether or not you want to submit statistical data to Ubuntu. I like to do this because it lets them know how many people are updating, and installing which programs from the repositories. Essentially it helps programs you like to use in the popularity contest of “default” programs.

Another optional step is to choose a different server. This can sometimes get your updates much faster, because you won’t be downloading from the same server as everyone else in the world. To do this, go back to the “Ubuntu Software” tab, and on the “Download From:” dropdown menu, choose “other” and then click “choose best server.” It will now run a series of tests to choose which server you are able to connect to and get the fastest speeds. When it finishes, it will automatically select the best choice, click “choose server,” then “close” and “close” again (the update button never works for me).

Now open up a terminal (Applications> Accessories > Terminal) and type sudo apt-get update, then sudo apt-get upgrade.

Fixing Update-Manager Behavior


I don’t like how update-manager behaves in this new version. What happens now is that once per day the update-manager window will open completely, but if you close it, you won’t see it until a week later unless you restart the computer. I prefer it to show an icon in the taskbar telling me that I need to update, and never pop up the update window.

Here are the steps to get back the old update-manager behavior (from the Release Notes):

Open a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal) and enter the following:


gconftool -s --type bool /apps/update-notifier/auto_launch false

Now you will have an icon in the taskbar if you have available updates.

Restricted Extras


By default, Ubuntu can’t have certain things installed like MP3 codecs, flash player, MS fonts, and Java. You probably will want to install all of these, and thankfully if you have enabled the repositories above, there are two packages that handle most of this.
open a terminal and enter:
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras linux-restricted-modules

enter “y” when it asks you if you want to install all the packages, then let it run.

During installation you should be prompted (in the terminal window) to setup Java, When this happens, scroll down to the bottom with either page-down or the down arrow key, then arrow to the right to get to “ok”. Hit enter, then move the selection left to “Yes” and hit enter again.

You now should be able to do these things.

Ubuntu Setup Guide Part I. Installation

Posted in Guides, Linux, Ubuntu by aliencam | No Comments »

This is the first in my updated “aliencam’s Customized Ubuntu Setup Guide” for Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty. The previous guide is for Ubuntu 8.04, and is now mostly out of date.

Before you install or upgrade to 9.04, I would suggest reading the release notes so you can see if there are any specific problems with your hardware and what the fixes are, or if fixes will be released in updates later. With my laptop, I see that there is a problem with some Intel video cards, and there are 3 options to fix that. (I will include those steps in this guide if the problem comes up)

I am installing Ubuntu 9.04 x64 Desktop on my Lenovo Thinkpad x61 tablet. I plan to do whatever I can to get ubuntu working as I like it, and to enable all of this laptop’s features. Some of what I will do is just for personal taste, and almost none of it is necessary. Here is what works on the x61t without any customization:

Trackpoint (mouse)
wifi
ethernet
audio
volume keys
USB devices
bluetooth
fn key adjustments (brightness, radio switch, battery, suspend, lock, etc)
“back” and “forward” buttons (next to arrow keys on keyboard)
tablet stylus (regular click works, but the eraser is only seen as regular click, and the right-click button does not work)
tablet “touch” (this is miscalibrated, where you poke is not where it reads)

settings I installed with: I install from a USB stick, use US International Keyboard with dead keys, a 154 GB EXT4 partition as root, and a 6 GB Swap partition. Timezone is set to “Phoenix” and I do not prefer to log in automatically.

This is just the introduction and once a few parts are completed I will start to compile them into a single post. I would do more than one segment tonight, but I have a final in MSE tomorrow morning, so I’m going to sleep instead.

–aliencam.

Installing Citrix ICA client

Posted in Guides, Linux by aliencam | 2 Comments »

Wow, this is an old post that somehow got put in drafts instead of posted… oops. Original write date was September 04, 2008. This guide should be similar for intrepid, but I will be rewriting it specifically for intrepid soon enough anyway.

This is installing Citrix client on ubuntu 8.04 i386

first, go to citrix.com, click download, and download citrix XenApp, for operating system select Linux, then click Linux ICA Clients below.  Then download the tar.bz file for English (currently version 10.6).

right-click, extract here for the file you downloaded, and then right-click on it, change permissions to create and delte files, read and write, and then click apply permissions to enclosed files.

Then open the setupwfc file in a terminal, and go through the options.

After this is installed, you probably already have firefox installed, but the ASU certificate (equifax) will not be accepted.

go to http://www.geotrust.com/resources/root_certificates/index.asp#WireLineandWireless  and download Equifax Secure Certificate Authority.  (I downloaded both the Base-64 encoded X.509 and the DER encoded X.509 versions because I wasn’t sure which were needed) to /home/$USERNAME/ICAClient/linuxx86/keystore/cacerts and change the file extensions to .crt instead of .cer.

Once those certificates are installed, restart firefox, and citrix should work.

-aliencam

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